15. 11. 2018
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Immigration minister in favour of refugees settling in French-speaking areas

Immigration minister in favour of refugees settling in French-speaking areas

With hundreds of refugees already being settled in New Brunswick and more on the way, Canada’s immigration minister says he thinks more should be landing in French-speaking communities.

The new arrivals in the province have so far been concentrated in its three largest cities —; Fredericton, Moncton and Saint John —; which are all predominantly English-speaking areas.

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READ MORE: Moncton groups overwhelmed with support for Syrian refugees

Immigration Minister John McCallum and the federal government are now calling on other areas to come forward.

“I think more could be sent to French-speaking communities, especially since the refugees are starting at square one. That would be a positive move,” McCallum said.

Areas including Bathurst and Edmundston could become part of the resettlement efforts in the coming weeks, which some provincial officials think would be a step in the right direction.

“It’s important that with 33 per cent of our population being Francophone, we want to try to bring in 33 per cent of those newcomers to ensure we maintain our linguistic balance,” said Alex Leblanc, the executive director of the New Brunswick Multicultural Council.

McCallum said with the majority of refugees knowing neither English nor French it’s essentially “a blank slate”, meaning the opportunity to learn either language is there.

READ MORE: Syrian refugees settling in Fredericton to get free transit service for year

However, with strong support systems in the province’s three major urban centres, smaller communities could struggle to match their resources.

“We have a settlement team here that enables them to go out, apply for jobs, start working,” said Justin Ryan of the Multicultural Association of the Greater Moncton Area.

“So the ability to not only have the jobs available, but to have the support to connect their skills to the jobs is the other essential linchpin.”

There is currently no timetable for a decision to be made regarding the expansion resettlement efforts.

15. 11. 2018
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Pass the blowtorch! Deep freeze causing headaches for Canada Post

Pass the blowtorch! Deep freeze causing headaches for Canada Post

After days of being unable to pry open their ice-encrusted community mailboxes in St. John’s, Helen Escott and her neighbours started getting creative.

First, people started packing de-icing liquid for their daily trip to the boxes. Then, when the ice still wouldn’t melt, they began using lighters and even raiding their kitchens to find something — anything — that would force the tiny metal doors open and liberate the letters and packages inside.

ChangSha Night Net

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    “My neighbour, who’s a chef, goes with his flambé thing and tries to warm it up,” Escott said from her Newfoundland and Labrador home on Tuesday.

    “Our neighbourhood will all be at the mailbox. At 5 o’clock or 5:30, you’ll see people out there. It reminds me of high school when everybody used to go out for a smoke. Everybody’s standing out there going ‘can I use your lighter?’ … It gets to the point where you just want to take a hammer to it.”

    (Canada Post is actively discouraging people from trying to break into the boxes using fire, chemicals or any kind of hammer.)

    There has been no shortage of issues with the new community mailboxes installed across Canada last fall under the previous government. They’ve been called too small, too easy to vandalize and just too difficult to access, but this latest problem — freezing locks and doors — is perhaps causing more headaches for Canada Post than any of the others.

    Reports of people being unable to turn their keys — or unable pull the keys back out again and breaking them off in the locks — began circulating in November and have increased since.

    Residents of Charlottetown were told that the new boxes had a different lock design that is more susceptible to freezing, and that a rapid rise, then drop, in temperature had sealed some of them shut. People in Montreal were told to sit tight and Canada Post would show up to thaw the boxes. Folks in Ottawa have been calling Canada Post’s 1-800 help line by the dozens asking for assistance.

    READ MORE: Mixed reaction to Liberal suspension of Canada Post mailbox program

    “It seems to be a common problem,” Escott noted, chuckling. “Newfoundland has different temperatures than they do in Vancouver, where they have palm trees. But in Newfoundland, where we just had two feet of snow last night and where it’s -1 C on a regular basis and could go down to -15 C, these boxes just don’t work.”

    Canada Post confirmed to Global News this week that it has received “a few hundred calls” in the National Capital Region about frozen boxes, in addition to the hundreds of others coming in from across the country. People unable to get through have taken to 桑拿会所 to vent their frustrations.

    @canadapostcorp

    #canadapost pic.twitter长沙桑拿/6duQDFS8lE

    “The unseasonably warm rainy weather immediately followed by a flash freeze and harsh winter conditions in various areas of the country has impacted many locks, including community mailboxes,” explained Canada Post spokesperson Mouktar Abdillahi.

    “Our teams are out there working on de-icing the locks in both new and older models. We appreciate everyone’s patience as we work to resolve this as quickly as possible.”

    Meanwhile, Escott — who changed over from door-to-door delivery to a community box last October — finally gained access to her mail late last week after two days of freezing temperatures. She said she has no problem with walking to get her letters and parcels, but there has to be a permanent fix to the freezing issue, or she and her neighbours will be going through the same thing next year.

    Canada Post could give mail carriers the tools to immediately de-ice frozen mailboxes when they spot them, she suggested, or at least give them a means of reporting the issue to someone who can get there to fix it. Another option might be a glass shelter like you see over bus stops.

    “At least you’d protect them. Here we use a lot of salt on the roads because of the ice. And when drivers go by, it splashes the ice up on the mailbox, which causes them to be encased in ice, too.”

    01:59

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15. 11. 2018
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Confederate flag’s removal turns Martin Luther King Day into celebration

Confederate flag’s removal turns Martin Luther King Day into celebration

COLUMBIA, S.C. – For the first time in 17 years, civil rights leaders gathered at the South Carolina Statehouse to pay homage to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. without the Confederate flag casting a long shadow over them.

The rebel banner was taken down over the summer after police said a young white man shot nine black church members to death during a Bible study in Charleston. The young man posted photos online showing him carrying the Confederate battle flag flown by forces supporting the secessionist, pro-slavery Southern states during the American Civil War.

Following the massacre at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, Republican Gov. Nikki Haley reversed course and made it a priority for lawmakers to pass legislation to remove the flag from the Statehouse grounds.

WATCH: Tens of thousands attend MLK parade in Texas



ChangSha Night Net “Isn’t this a great day? It’s so nice to be standing here and not looking at that flag,” said Ezell Pittman, who had attended most of the King Day anti-flag rallies since they started in 2000. “I always had faith it would come down. I hate it took what it did, but was real happy to see it go.”

Across the country, the 30th anniversary of the holiday to honour the civil rights leader assassinated in 1968, was remembered in different ways. In Michigan, people delivered bottled water to residents of Flint amid the city’s drinking water crisis. In Atlanta, an overflow crowd listened as to the U.S. housing secretary talk about the 50th anniversary of King’s visit to Chicago to launch a campaign for fair housing. In Minnesota, a rally against police brutality was planned.

Lonnie Randolph, president of the South Carolina chapter of the NAACP, a leading civil rights group, said the flag’s removal was tangible evidence the state cares about civil rights when pushed hard enough. But he warned there would be other fights ahead.

WATCH: For the second year in a row dirt-bikes, all-terrain vehicles and motorcycles ripped through the streets and freeways of South Florida on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

“I promise you, the people that gather in this building – your building – will do something this year to cause us to return to insure freedom, justice and equality is made possible for all people,” Randolph said, motioning toward the capitol behind him.

Randolph promised to keep coming to the Statehouse until King’s dream is fully realized in a state where there are wide gaps in education achievement between school districts in rich, white communities and poorer, black ones, and where the governor and Republican-dominated Legislature have refused to take federal money to expand health care coverage to more lower-income residents.

About 1,000 people gathered at the Statehouse on a clear, cold day, drawn in part by appearances by all three main Democratic presidential candidates – former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley.

READ MORE: Democratic primary candidates embrace Barack Obama legacy

Sanders reminded the crowd King was a dynamic leader who wanted to help the poor. O’Malley said King would be ashamed his county has made it harder to vote and easier to buy a gun.

Only Clinton dealt directly with the flag. She credited Haley and the Republicans with working with the NAACP after the church shooting and choosing King’s legacy over hatred.

“We couldn’t celebrate him and the Confederacy. We had to choose,” Clinton said. “And South Carolina made the right choice.”

In the U.S., President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama followed the King Day theme of community service by planting vegetable seeds at a District of Columbia elementary school to honour the civil rights leader and celebrate Mrs. Obama’s anti-childhood obesity initiative.

WATCH: FBI director criticizes FBI’s treatment of Martin Luther King.

They also stuffed bags with books for needy children along with young people who participate in a White House mentoring program and volunteers from the AmeriCorps national service program.

Elsewhere, an overflow crowd showed up at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, where King once preached, to celebrate his legacy at an annual commemorative service. It capped more than a week of events under the theme: “Remember! Celebrate! Act! King’s Legacy of Freedom for Our World.”

While people have been distracted by TV reality shows and music “that tears down instead of uplifts,” many injustices have occurred and “we’re about to create right here in this civilized society the wild, wild west with guns,” said King’s daughter, the Rev. Bernice King.

“Y’all, we can’t keep being distracted, because if you’re not careful, we’re about to allow a reality show host to bully himself into becoming president of the United States of America,” she said, in a reference to Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump.

READ MORE: Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith boycotting this year’s Oscars ceremony

U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro told the church audience that King moved into a Chicago apartment on the city’s west side 50 years ago and described seeing “a daily battle against depression and hopelessness” as babies were attacked by rats and children wore clothes too thin to protect against the Midwest winter.

“You see, Dr. King knew that housing was more than about just bricks and mortar,” Castro said.

In Minneapolis, activists braved frigid temperatures as they marched onto a Mississippi River bridge that connects Minneapolis and St. Paul to protest the deaths of two black men shot by police last year in the Twin Cities.

In California, protesters from the Black Lives Matter group shut down one side of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge when they stopped vehicles in the westbound lanes and chained themselves and the cars together to form a line across the bridge. The Black Lives Matter movement emerged after incidents in which police killed unarmed blacks in Ferguson, Missouri, New York and elsewhere.

15. 11. 2018
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Touching photo of service dog comforting anxious bride-to-be goes viral

Touching photo of service dog comforting anxious bride-to-be goes viral

A three-year-old yellow lab is being hailed a hero after a photo of the pup comforting an anxious bride on her wedding day was posted to social media.

Bella, a service dog trained in recognizing panic attacks, is the companion of Valerie Parrott of Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Parrott, who was married this month, suffers from anxiety, which can be a crippling disorder, especially during periods of heightened stress.

Parrott relies on Bella to help avoid and prevent episodes of panic.

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    “Bella’s medical alert title refers to her ability to predict and inform me of different types of body changes,” wrote Parrot on her blog.

    Parrott was just finishing getting into her wedding dress when she felt a panic attack coming.

    Recognizing Parrott’s anxiousness, Bella put her training to work, using a simple nudge against the knee to help comfort her master.

    “Usually, her warning is all I need to get to a safe place or to take action to prevent a panic attack,” wrote Parrott.

    The remarkable moment of companionship was caught on camera by Parrott’s wedding photographer.

    “It’s so much more than just a photo, and I recognize that,” photographer Maddie Peschong told CNN.

    The photo was posted to popular aggregate site Reddit, and has since exploded in popularity garnering more than 1.6 million views.

    “It’s not that it’s anymore beautiful than any other photo,” said Peschong. “It’s 100 per cent about the moment. And that’s all Val, and that’s all Bella.”

    It was just one of many special moments Peschong caught between Parrott and her pouch.

    “I think it’s possible people don’t realize that while Bella was an adorable part of the wedding, she was definitely there to work,” said Peschong.

    Parrott believes the photos are a good reminder for the public, and herself, of just how influential a service dog can be.

    “It captures a side of being a service dog team that sometimes you almost forget is there,” Parrott told CBS. “we rely on each other so much.”

    “To have Val be able to turn this into a really teachable moment to educate about service dogs, has been extremely special,” said Peschong.

15. 11. 2018
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New curriculum offers B.C. students coding basics

New curriculum offers B.C. students coding basics

VANCOUVER – Students in British Columbia’s public elementary schools are on track to become the first generation to get basic training in computer coding as the province answers a call from its thriving tech sector.

Some children in grades six to nine will begin learning the ABCs of digital technology once the government adds coding to teachers’ lesson plans in its modernized curriculum.

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Schools will receive the new curriculum in September and the program is slated to be phased in over three years. The goal is to expose all kindergarten to Grade 12 students to coding basics within the next decade.

Premier Christy Clark announced the plan Monday among several initiatives to address a shortage of workers with digital skills that are needed by B.C. tech firms in the government’s bid to bolster the knowledge economy.

“You’ve told us … you need more talent. We know that’s crucial for your success,” Clark told about 2,800 delegates at the BCTech Summit.

“Tech companies will locate in places where they can find the people that will be capable of doing the work. We need to start that in our schools.”

Specific details, including costs to implement the curriculum changes, weren’t revealed as the program remains under development. Government officials said teachers will be given the opportunity to learn about coding during professional development days.

The officials said they looked to jurisdictions including Ontario and Britain as examples in designing the policy, but noted there’s no place that’s implemented coding long enough to know its results.

So far, the province has spent $500,000 running five coding academies over the past year for post-secondary students and has committed to expanding those camps into the next fiscal year. It also supported a program that ran nearly 700 events called Hour of Code.

Jeremy Shaki, CEO of Lighthouse Labs, which has held free coding boot camps for thousands of citizens, said he would have loved to see the new curriculum delivered last year, but is thrilled by recent progress.

“A lot of people have been banging this door for a couple years now,” said Shaki. “By putting it out there, it means they’ll have to develop it.”

New Brunswick and Nova Scotia have made similar commitments to coding over the past two years, while the United Kingdom made coding a mandatory part of school curriculum in 2014.

New York City announced last fall that all of its public schools will be required to offer computer science to all students, and Chicago is working on a similar initiative.

Melody Ma, a Vancouver web-developer who convinced the government to participate in the Hour of Code, said revising B.C.’s curriculum is great but she has concerns.

“What are the resources on the back-end to actually support this? We haven’t heard what those plans are. How are we actually going to make this happen? Not every child in school has access to a computer,” she said.

The disparity in resources around the province became clear when Ma helped put on a free coding event at an older high school in Prince George, B.C. Some 100 participating students had to learn offline when they ran out of Internet bandwidth.

Tech firm CEO Alexandra Greenhill is a mother of three girls, ages five to 13, who believes the potential of an entire generation will be undermined if coding is not made a core part of the education system.

She believes savvy policy will find ways, such as implementing a simple card game she invented called “Little Codr” that teaches kids to think like computers.

“We don’t teach you language for you to become a poet or English professor,” she said. “I don’t want my kids to automatically become coders. I want them to know enough about this so they’re not intimidated and they can choose to embrace it if they want to.”

— Follow @TamsynBurgmann on 桑拿会所

15. 11. 2018
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Video shows missing Markham woman talking with man minutes after she was last seen

Video shows missing Markham woman talking with man minutes after she was last seen

TORONTO —; Police have released surveillance video they believe shows missing Markham woman Taneesha Brown briefly talking with an unknown man minutes after she was last seen.

Investigators are also using the footage to help guide their search, and are checking nearby ponds.

The footage made public Monday on YouTube shows a woman walking across the near-empty parking lot of Bur Oak Secondary School in Markham around 10:48 p.m. Tuesday and briefly chatting with the man before walking away in a southbound direction.

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Investigators with York region police have said Brown was last seen at 10:30 that night at her aunt’s home in the McCowan Road and Castlemore Avenue area —; a short distance from the school —; and told her family members she was stepping out for some fresh air but never returned.

READ MORE: Police seek help locating 25-year-old Markham woman missing since Tuesday

On Monday, they said Brown is also believed to have attended an event at Bur Oak Secondary that night.

The man is described as a witnesses, not a suspect, and he is asked to contact police.

Police are also focusing search efforts on the direction Brown is recorded heading in, as the force’s marine unit began scouring waters west of the high school as they try to locate her.

A remotely operated vehicle will be checking open water in the partially frozen ponds, police said Monday.

Investigators and family members have said they have received no information on her possible whereabouts and are increasingly concerned for her well-being, as they believe she is not suitably dressed for the weather.

Uriel Brown said his daughter had mental health issues and that he had introduced her to the teachings of the Nation of Islam in hopes it would help her instead of medication.

Brown is described by police as a black woman standing 5’5″ tall, weighing 122 pounds, with black shoulder-length hair and pink highlights.

She was last seen wearing a traditional Muslim outfit consisting of a white, knee-length dashiki, with white pants underneath, a white hijab on her head and carrying a black purse.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the York Regional Police #5 District Criminal Investigations Bureau at 1-866-876-5423, ext.7541, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-tips, leave an anonymous tip online at 长沙桑拿按摩论坛长沙夜生活1800222tips长沙桑拿 or text your tip to CRIMES (274637) starting with the word YORK.

WATCH ABOVE: Taneesha Brown, 25, vanished from her aunt’s house Tuesday. Police are concerned for her well-being. Mark Carcasole reports.

15. 11. 2018
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Your Saskatchewan: January 2016

Your Saskatchewan: January 2016

Every day on the Evening News and News Hour Final, we feature a viewer submitted photo for Your Saskatchewan.

To submit a picture for Your Saskatchewan, email to [email protected]长沙夜网.

Pictures should be at least 920 pixels wide and in jpeg format.

GALLERY: Your Saskatchewan December 2015

Jan. 2: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Connie Kirychuk at Weyakwin Lake.

Connie Kirychuk / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 3: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Marcy Yewsuk near Melville.

Marcy Yewsuk / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 4: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Micheline Creary near Major, Sask.

Micheline Creary / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 5: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Jacqui Ferguson in Saskatoon.

Jacqui Ferguson / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 6: This Your Saskatchewan photo was sent in by Vicki Metheral near Vanscoy with the title “frosted mini-wheats.”

Vicki Metheral / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 7: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Kevin Clark at Fosston.

Kevin Clark / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 8: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Jenn Kreese near Leask.

Jenn Kreese / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 9: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Adele Booth of icicles on the south shore of Chitek Lake.

Adele Booth / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 10: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Bob Livingston at Meeting Lake.

Bob Livingston / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 11: Bob Green took this Your Saskatchewan photo of the demolition Sunday of two spans on Saskatoon’s 109-year-old Traffic Bridge.

Bob Green / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 12: Heidi Fischer took this Your Saskatchewan photo of the remnants of Saskatoon’s Traffic Bridge.

Heidi Fischer / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 13: This Your Saskatchewan photo of ice fishing on Blackstrap Lake was snapped by Jared Thorvaldson.

Jared Thorvaldson / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 14: Sharon Thomson took this Your Saskatchewan photo south of Alsask.

Sharon Thomson / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 15: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken near Foam Lake by Faye Campbell.

Faye Campbell / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 16: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Brandi Mae of a coyote by the weir in Saskatoon.

Brandi Mae / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 17: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Pat Borchardt near Biggar.

Pat Borchardt / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 18: Valerie Horner took this Your Saskatchewan photo of a blue jay in Prince Albert.

Valerie Horner / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 19: This Your Saskatchewan photo of little Ashlyn bundled up for the cold weather in Cumberland House was taken by Ashton Mckay.

Ashton Mckay / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 20: Celeste Toews took this Your Saskatchewan photo at Turtle Lake.

Celeste Toews / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 21: This Your Saskatchewan photo of some sheep in Alvena was taken by Crystal Chan.

Crystal Chan / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 22: Colleen Clavelle took this Your Saskatchewan photo near Clavet.

Colleen Clavelle / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 23: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Nancy Scott of a sundog west of Melfort.

Nancy Scott / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 24: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Notanee Bourassa in Regina.

Notanee Bourassa / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 25: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Dineen Daniels in Cumberland House of one of the many vigils being held for the tragedy in La Loche.

Dineen Daniels / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 26: Trevor Altman took this Your Saskatchewan photo of an ice igloo they built in Creighton.

Trevor Altman / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 27: This Your Saskatchewan photo of a sundog was taken by Tim Gee in Regina.

Tim Gee / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 28: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Karoline Mallow of 19-month-old Makenley and Kloe, 7, playing on snowy steps in Saskatoon.

Karoline Mallow / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 29: Morin Nola took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Sandy Bay.

Morin Nola / Viewer Submitted

Jan. 30: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Casey Caplette near North Battleford.

Casey Caplette / Viewer Supplied

Jan. 31: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Vicki Metheral near Vanscoy.

Vicki Metheral / Viewer Supplied
ChangSha Night Net

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15. 11. 2018
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Snow causes headaches for Montreal drivers

Snow causes headaches for Montreal drivers

MONTREAL – Driving in and about the city was a bit of a bumpy ride Monday.

Montrealers woke up to a snowfall that covered highways and major arteries in the region, causing slippery roads, delays, stalled cars and numerous accidents.

“Off island, particularly was very, very slippery,” said Global News traffic reporter Debbi Marsellos.

“Right off the Île-aux-Tourtes span, on the T-Can eastbound at Morgan, we had stall after stall, accident after accident.”

ChangSha Night Net

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    For drivers near Sainte-Hélène-de-Bagot, things were even worse.

    A series of collisions involving three to four trucks and about 15 to 20 vehicles forced the closure of all westbound lanes on Highway 20, east of Saint-Hyacinthe.

    One person died and several others were injured as a result of the accidents.

    CAA-Quebec said on days like this, drivers need to make sure they slow down to be extra cautious.

    “The key thing that we should know is really to decrease our speed,” said CAA-Quebec spokesperson Anne-Sophie Hamel.

    “So, just trying to not go as fast and make sure everybody is safe on the road.”

    CAA-Quebec said by 12 p.m. Monday, they received about 1,600 calls.

    That number could reach 3,000 by Tuesday morning.

    Hamel told Global News that one thing everyone can do to help reduce those calls is to properly clean their cars before driving.

    “Sometimes people only take the snow off their windows, but make sure that there’s no snow on the roof and your hood,” she said.

    The snow may not be over yet – the forecast features more of the same – snow, high winds and cold temperatures for the next 24 hours.

15. 11. 2018
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Deaths of seven Quebecers strengthen resolve in terrorism fight: Couillard

Deaths of seven Quebecers strengthen resolve in terrorism fight: Couillard

QUEBEC CITY – Premier Philippe Couillard said nothing can explain attacks on people who work to build a better world.

Couillard paid tribute Monday to seven Quebecers who died in terrorist attacks abroad late last week in Indonesia and Burkina Faso.

READ MORE: 6 Quebecers killed in Burkina Faso terror attack identified

A Laval resident died Thursday in Jakarta while six people from the Quebec City area were killed during a siege in Ouagadougou late Friday.

WATCH: Terror in Ouagadougou

Justin Trudeau offers condolences for Burkina Faso victims

02:13
Justin Trudeau offers condolences for Burkina Faso victims
02:56
6 Quebecers killed in Burkina Faso terror attacks
00:35
Trudeau asks for moment of silence for Canadians killed in Burkina attack
02:25
6 Canadians killed in attacks in Burkina Faso

The premier said in a statement at the legislature in Quebec City that the fight against terrorists must continue.

Couillard said the violence that seemed so far away in the past very much affects people here at home and the heinous acts should strengthen the determination to fight the perpetrators of these acts.

ChangSha Night Net

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    Justin Trudeau offers condolences for Burkina Faso victims

15. 11. 2018
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Scholastic pulls children’s book over slavery criticism

Scholastic pulls children’s book over slavery criticism

Scholastic has pulled an illustrated children’s book after complaints that the storyline makes light of slavery.

The book, A Birthday Cake for George Washington, presents a problem the first U.S. president’s “servants” face when making his cake — a lack of sugar.

ChangSha Night Net

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    The title’s description on Scholastic’s website says the story is based on real events, and claims to “Serve up a slice of history in a picture book narrative that will surely satisfy.”

    READ MORE: Outrage after textbook calls black slaves ‘workers’, publisher admits error

    “Hercules, a slave, takes great pride in baking the president’s cake. But this year there is one problem — they are out of sugar.”

    It details the story of Hercules and his daughter Delia, who no matter how sweet the cake turns out to be, “will not taste the sweetness of freedom.”

    The story was penned by New York Times food writer Ramin Ganeshram and illustratated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton. It was released on Jan. 5.

    The cover of the book “A Birthday Cake for George Washington” by by Ramin Ganeshram.

    Scholastic via AP

    The book has been slammed on Amazon, with 80 per cent of reviewers giving it one star.

    “I can’t believe people are celebrating a children’s story that depicts happy, joyful slaves. Horrible. Please don’t let your children read this,” says one reviewer.

    “An insulting tale that sprinkles glitter on rape, murder, torture and servitude,” says another.

    “Next there will be a book about the Jews baking a cake for Hitler! Disgusting.”

    On Sunday Scholastic released a statement announcing it would stop distributing the book.

    “While we have great respect for the integrity and scholarship of the author, illustrator, and editor, we believe that, without more historical background on the evils of slavery than this book for younger children can provide, the book may give a false impression of the reality of the lives of slaves and therefore should be withdrawn,” the statement reads.

    Despite positive intentions by the author, the statement goes on, the book does not meet Scholastic’s “standards of appropriate presentation of information to younger children.”

    The author’s 桑拿会所 account appears to have been removed since Scholastic’s decision, but in a blog post last week Ganeshram wrote that she spent four years researching the book, and defends the choice to depict the characters as proud, happy people.

    Scholastic says it will accept all returns of the book.